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What Is Spondylosis and How Is It Treated?

You’re diagnosed with spondylosis—now what? What is this condition, and what can you do to find relief? A helpful first step is understanding what exactly spondylosis is. Let’s learn together and talk about what your treatment options are. 

What is Spondylosis, and What Are Its Signs and Symptoms?

Spondylosis (also called osteoarthritis of the spine) is a general term used to describe degenerative changes in the spine. Any area of your spine can be affected by spondylosis, but it’s most often found in the neck (cervical region) and lower back (lumbar region).

Spondylosis leads to changes in the size, shape, and alignment of the bones and spinal discs in your back. As the condition progresses over time, spinal discs can become stiff and thin, and vertebral bones can wear down and develop abnormal bony growth in response, called bone spurs. Eventually, these changes can become significant enough to lead to uncomfortable symptoms, including: 

  • Back pain
  • Back stiffness
  • Muscle spasms (as the muscles over your spine become tight and tense as a protective response to the underlying spinal degeneration)
  • Pain, numbness, and tingling in an arm or leg, following the distribution of a spinal nerve (this can happen when a nerve in the spine becomes pinched or irritated by degenerating spinal joints, bones, and discs)

People with spondylosis often notice that their symptoms get better or worse depending on factors like time of day, activity, direction of movement (e.g., bending forward vs bending backward), and even mental or emotional stress. 

Advancing age and the cumulative effects of a lifetime of “wear and tear” on the spine are the most common causes of spondylosis, although people who have a history of trauma or surgery in the spine, a physically demanding job, and/or a sedentary lifestyle appear to be more likely to develop symptoms. 

Living With Spondylosis: Your Treatment Options

Remember, spondylosis doesn’t always lead to symptoms—but the condition can get worse over time, so it’s a good idea to practice spine-healthy habits throughout your life! Exercise daily, eat nutrient-rich foods, use proper body mechanics when lifting objects or operating heavy machinery, and stay at a healthy weight.

If you have symptomatic spondylosis, a combination of interventions like physical therapy, medications, and nerve blocking injections can help you find relief. Ongoing conditions like spondylosis do best with quality, ongoing care, such as a comprehensive pain management plan, so be sure to connect with an experienced team of providers you can trust.​

Discover Spondylosis Relief in Ohio

If you live near Columbus, Springfield, or Dublin, Ohio, and are looking for relief from spondylosis pain and dysfunction, call Integrated Pain Solutions today at (614) 383-6450 to schedule an appointment.

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January 18, 2022
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